Tim Tebow is once again in the news after he delivered a defense of the NCAA’s backwards stance on amateurism today.

Tebow’s argument came during an appearance on First Take, because of course it did, and you can watch it here:

Tebow’s argument boiled down to the fact that he was okay with being exploited as a college athlete, and therefore everyone else should be exploited as well. Also, as many pointed out, this entire debate stems from the progress of California legislation that would allow athletes to profit off of their name and likeness, which means this is very clearly a political discussion. It’s almost like it’s dumb and impossible to try and separate sports from politics!

Tebow is now (sort of) a baseball player, but he also does work for the SEC Network, which means his own ESPN colleagues were quick to point out the issues with his case.

Keith Olbermann also pointed out how his own privilege had shaped his career:

Tebow’s argument included mentioning how he had one of the top-selling jerseys in the world, and while he didn’t profit off of that, he’s okay with it. Even if you admire his stance on that issue, and even if Tebow had come to Florida with nothing (not true, but hang with it), in the years since, he’s clearly been financially rewarded, both on the field and off. Had Tebow left school without any kind of professional future, and with his only marketable days behind him, his views might be very different now.

That’s the case for most college athletes who #goproinsomethingotherthansports: even if they end up using their degree and landing a decent job, or even building a career, they have clearly missed out on a revenue-earning window of their life they may never see again.

The plus side of Tebow’s argument: we were granted the spectacle of ESPN personalities debating each other over a political issue on an otherwise-boring Friday, which surely made management happy.

About Jay Rigdon

Jay is a writer and editor for The Comeback, and a contributor at Awful Announcing. He is not a strong swimmer.