The Saints loss last week to the Vikings ended their season in heartbreaking fashion, and it’s possible it was also the last game Drew Brees plays.

Brees hasn’t made any decisions yet, but even if he comes back next season, he’ll be 41, and retirement clearly has to be an option. A report today from ESPN’s Adam Schefter confirms the conventional wisdom that when Brees does step away from the field, he’ll likely be able to step right into a role as an analyst, if that’s what he wants to do.

Via ESPN:

Drew Brees still hasn’t made a decision about his future, but the New Orleans Saints star quarterback has received calls from at least one non-ESPN network to inquire about whether he would be interested in transitioning from quarterback to TV game analyst, league sources told ESPN.

This doesn’t necessarily mean Brees will retire or definitely wind up in television, but it does show that he will have attractive options following his playing career.

“Drew has not spoken with them or anyone about any new opportunities,” one source close to Brees told ESPN this weekend. “Until such time as a decision is made about next season, he will not be engaging in any conversations regarding or considering any new opportunities.”

Schefter explicitly notes it’s a non-ESPN network, but if Brees does decide that being a game analyst at this point is the most attractive option, it seems very likely that ESPN would be very interested in Brees for their Monday Night Football booth, which would probably be the highest-profile analyst position available this offseason. Of course, as Schefter notes, the Saints still feel like Brees is likely to come back:

Saints coach Sean Payton said on ESPN’s Sunday NFL Countdown that he thinks Brees will return to the Saints next season and that he anticipates speaking to Brees as early as Monday.

And no matter how prestigious a broadcasting position is it’s hard to think it matches up with a year or two more of being a starting NFL quarterback. Plus, should Brees decide that a post-playing media career is something he wants to pursue, he may decide that studio work is more appealing, or any number of other scenarios. But the news is certainly a sign that networks are more aggressive than ever when going after big name players for on-air roles.

[ESPN]

About Jay Rigdon

Jay is a writer and editor for The Comeback, and a contributor at Awful Announcing. He is not a strong swimmer.