vegas golden knights-cox-at&t

As the first game in Vegas Golden Knights history approached, it looked like a huge chunk of the area’s fans would unable to watch their new NHL team. Because up until the day of the Golden Knights’ inaugural matchup with the Dallas Stars, Cox and AT&T were locked in a standoff over whether the cable company would carry AT&T SportsNet Rocky Mountain (formerly ROOT Sports).

But on Friday morning, only hours before the Golden Knights’ debut, the two sides reached an agreement according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, which will allow Cox customers access to the station.

This was no small issue. Per the Review-Journal, Cox is the biggest carrier in the Las Vegas Valley, and surely the Golden Knights would not have been thrilled to kick off their franchise with a swath of its brand new fanbase blocked from watching. The team was understandably grateful that AT&T and Cox reached an agreement in time for Opening Night. Via the Review-Journal:

“We would like to thank both AT&T SportsNet and Cox for their commitment and dedication to reaching an agreement,” said Vegas Golden Knights Chairman and CEO Bill Foley. “There was a significant amount of work put in from both sides, and we are appreciative of these efforts.”

AT&T officials also were happy about the deal.

“We are excited to be able to announce this deal with Cox and bring the Vegas Golden Knights games to their customers in Las Vegas and surrounding areas,” said Nina Kinch, vice president of affiliate relations. “We are anxious to see the team perform and looking forward to viewers having access to our network and Emmy Award-winning productions.”

The Golden Knights took a risk when they agreed to make AT&T SportsNet Rocky Mountain its TV partner even though the network wasn’t carried on Cox or CenturyLink, but with both providers having come to the table, the risk has officially paid off.

With Cox viewers watching, the Golden Knights beat the Stars 2-1 on Friday to record their first ever win, so everything seems to have worked out just fine.

[Las Vegas Review-Journal]

About Alex Putterman

Alex is a writer and editor for The Comeback and Awful Announcing. He has written for The Atlantic, VICE Sports, MLB.com, SI.com, the Hartford Courant, Baseball Prospectus, Land of 10 and more. He is a proud alum of Northwestern University and The Daily Northwestern. You can find him on Twitter @AlexPutterman.

  • Ron Flatter

    Only Cox viewers who could find the needle in the 650-channel haystack saw Friday’s opener. For most of us, though, Cox did not list the game in its on-screen guide. And its much-ballyhooed button C, which posts a scoreboard with an immediate link to channels showing each game, switched viewers to a blacked-out feed. The phrase “tree in the forest” comes to mind.