Curt Schilling sells off his bloody sock

Ed Note: The following article regarding the fate of ESPN analyst Curt Schilling's most famous piece of wardrobe appears courtesy Bloguin's central MLB hub, The Outside Corner.

Curt Schilling's financial problems have led him to auction off one of his famous bloody socks.

The stained sock he wore in Game 2 of the 2004 World Series, pitching six innings on a sutured ankle, was sold to an anonymous bidder for $92,613. The more famous bloody sock — the one from Game 6 of the ALCS that year — was thrown away after Boston's win in Yankee Stadium. The sock sold at the auction had previously been sitting in baseball's Hall of Fame Museum.

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After his playing days were over, Schilling invested about $50 million into the now-bankrupt video game company, 38 Studios. It was a decision that would cost him every penny he earned playing baseball. Now, Schilling is being sued by the state of Rhode Island. The state's economic development agency approved a guaranteed $75 million loan to lure the company out of Massachusetts back in 2010. When the company went belly-up less than two years after the deal, the state was on the hook for $100 million after interest.

Understandably, they're a little agitated, and claim Schilling and others committed fraud by hiding the fact the company would run out of money from the state. Schilling has called the lawsuit "political," since it came after he made some less-than-flattering remarks about the state's governor.

Even with Rhode Island after his assets, Schilling apparently won't have to surrender the 92 grand from this sale to them.

[Associated Press]

Follow Jaymes on Twitter @JaymesL and TOC at @Outside_Corner.

Matt Yoder

About Matt Yoder

Managing Editor of Awful Announcing and award winning sportswriter. Bloguin consigliere. The biggest cat in the whole wide world.

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