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‘Look At This Clown,’ Thom Brennaman

 
Thom Brennaman and Brian Billick called the Lions game again this week and managed to be a little bit more bearable than last week’s game, during which they were so gung ho on their pre-game plan that they lost all control of themselves when they were “finally, finally” able to play it up. For the greater part of this week’s game, they didn’t draw all that much attention to themselves, which is never a bad thing. There were a couple things that stuck out, though.

On the opening kickoff of the second half, Raiders backup safety Jerome Boyd blindsided Lions backup cornerback Don Carey with a helmet-to-helmet hit that wiped out a huge return. Brennaman handled it well while maintaining his composure, realizing almost as soon as the flag hit the ground that the play would be coming back as a result of the hit. After a few replays and some thoughts from Billick, it appeared FOX was headed for a commercial break as Carey ran off the field (you can even hear a bit of commercial music in the background). They didn’t, though, and instead captured Boyd gloating on the sidelines. That’s when Brennaman interjected with what’s in my opinion his best commentary since the Magglio home run [clean video from Guyism]:

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Brennaman should’ve put the mic away right there and called it a career. A-plus, but then he went and turned himself into the clown.

With the Lions down 13 points and facing a fourth-and-two inside the Red Zone with six minutes left in the game, Brennaman seriously suggested the Lions should just take the three points. Of course, Brennaman is not the first announcer ever to imply he’d make a terrible head coach. But usually when one announcer loses all common sense, his partner chimes in to clear the situation up and they move on. Maybe because he didn’t feel comfortable with Brian Billick being the voice of reason, Brennaman stubbornly went to the commercial break teasing a discussion about why the Lions wouldn’t just kick a field goal (to make it 27-17) and “try to get the ball back one more time.” Either Brennaman’s math failed him miserably or he thinks touchdowns are worth more in the fourth quarter. Listen:

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